What’s a Forward proxies and Reverse proxies?

  Proxy servers and tunneling

  When navigating through different networks of the Internet, proxy servers and HTTP tunnels are facilitating access to content on the World Wide Web. A proxy can be on the user’s local computer, or anywhere between the user’s computer and a destination server on the Internet. This page outlines some basics about proxies and introduces a few configuration options.

What’s a Forward proxies and Reverse proxies?

  There are two types of proxies: forward proxies (or tunnel, or gateway) and reverse proxies (used to control and protect access to a server for load-balancing, authentication, decryption or caching).

  Forward proxies

  A forward proxy, or gateway, or just “proxy” provides proxy services to a client or a group of clients. There are likely hundreds of thousands of open forward proxies on the Internet. They store and forward Internet services (like the DNS, or web pages) to reduce and control the bandwidth used by the group.

  Forward proxies can also be anonymous proxies and allow users to hide their IP address while browsing the Web or using other Internet services. routes internet traffic through multiple proxies for anonymity.

  Reverse proxies

  As the name implies, a reverse proxy does the opposite of what a forward proxy does: A forward proxy acts on behalf of clients (or requesting hosts). Forward proxies can hide the identities of clients whereas reverse proxies can hide the identities of servers. Reverse proxies have several use cases, a few are:

  Load balancing: distribute the load to several web servers,

  Cache static content: offload the web servers by caching static content like pictures,

  Compression: compress and optimize content to speed up load time.